Speakers and General Meetings

Denver Chapter Meetings

Denver Chapter meetings are on the second Monday of each month, unless otherwise noted. There is no meeting in July and the meeting in December is a special member’s night. Meetings locations will be noted for each meeting.

Chapter meeting dates for 2019:

  • January 15 – Tuesday night
  • February 11
  • March 11
  • April 8
  • May 13
  • June 10
  • August 12
  • September 9
  • October 14
  • November 11
  • December 9 — members night

All are welcome!


Upcoming Meetings

Tuesday, January 15th, 2019

Sturm 154
Sturm Building
University of Denver
2000 E Asbury Ave, Denver, CO 80210
The building is located just off High Street on Asbury Ave. There is parking available directly adjacent to the building on the west side. Most street parking around the area is time-limited, so please be aware of where you are parking for the meeting.
7:00 PM

Speaker:
Dr. Meredith A. Wismer

Title:
Good Things in Small Packages? Investigating Pocket Gophers as Food at the Rainbow Site.

Abstract:
Archaeologists often exclude the remains of burrowing rodents when reconstructing the diets of ancient people, as frequently these creatures intrude into a site long after it was formed. A surprising number and spatial concentration of pocket gopher specimens from the Rainbow Site (13PM91) in northwestern Iowa suggests that people
accumulated a large quantity of pocket gophers for use during the Early Late Woodland period (AD 550-620). Individually, pocket gophers may have had little to offer nutritionally; however, collectively their predictable habits, visibility on the landscape, and fat content may have made them a valuable supplement during lean winter months. This talk examines the possibility of pocket gophers as a “survival” food for Rainbow’s prehistoric inhabitants and explores how they may have been obtained and processed. Importantly, most methods for cooking and consuming pocket gophers leave little evidence behind for archaeologists to find, perhaps leading us to underestimate their use as food by ancient people.

Speaker Bio:
Dr. Meredith A. Wismer is a zooarchaeologist and instructor of anthropology at Aims Community College in Greeley, Colorado. She was recently awarded a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Iowa, where her dissertation research focused on animal use during the transition to horticulture within the tallgrass prairie region. She has worked on archaeological projects in Arizona, Alaska, France, Romania, and Colorado.


Monday, February 11th, 2019

Sturm 154
Sturm Building
University of Denver
2000 E Asbury Ave, Denver, CO 80210
The building is located just off High Street on Asbury Ave. There is parking available directly adjacent to the building on the west side. Most street parking around the area is time-limited, so please be aware of where you are parking for the meeting.
7:00 PM

Speaker:
Dr. Jamie Hodgkins

Title:
Climate change and the evolution of us

Abstract:
New species belonging to the genus Homo are discovered more and more frequently. Paleoanthropological research has revealed that our own family lineage is far more complex than once thought, yet it is also true that through time this diversity has been whittled down to one remaining species, Homo sapiens. Understanding why our species has survived when others did not is key to determining what makes us “human” and where we fit into the natural world. Reconstructing landscapes use patterns, hunting, and foraging behaviors, and the mobility of early modern humans and our closest fossil relatives the Neandertals can help tease apart ecological factors that contributed to our success. Using a combination of zooarchaeology, isotope geochemistry, and aerial photography this talk will summarize work currently in progress to reconstruct the daily foraging habits, and nutritional choices of early modern humans in Africa and of Neandertals in Europe. Reconstructions of the ecological changes to the environment experienced by hominids in both of these locations will also be discussed.

Speaker Bio:
Jamie Hodgkins received her PhD from Arizona State University in 2012. She is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Colorado Denver. Working in Spain, France, Italy, Bulgaria, Morocco, and South Africa allowed her to explore the history of each country. As an archaeologist her work focuses on reconstructing the behaviors of early modern humans (Homo sapiens) and Neandertals and what those behaviors indicate about what it means to be “human”. Her publications center on how humans (including Neandertals) and animals dealt with climate change in the Pleistocene. She publishes in peer-reviewed journals including: The Journal of Human Evolution, Journal of Archaeological Science, Quaternary Science Reviews, Paleoanthropology, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Her highest impact publication thus far is: Climate-mediated shifts in Neandertal subsistence behaviors at Pech de l’Azé IV and Roc de Marsal (Dordogne Valley, France). Journal of Human Evolution. 96:1-18


Saving Places Conference, 2019

For 21 years, Colorado Preservation, Inc.’s (CPI) Saving Places® Conference has gathered individuals from across the state (and widely beyond) to strengthen historic preservation efforts through networking and education. CPI is a statewide nonprofit that promotes historic preservation statewide by providing advocacy, education, outreach, and preservation services to communities and individuals.

The 2019 Saving Places® Conference will focus on The Next Generation of Preservation: A CALL TO ACTION which will explore the changes, threats, challenges, and successes of the preservation movement along with the communities and leaders working to move it forward. You can expect over 80 engaging sessions, workshops, and tours. AIA and APA credits available including a Preservation Leadership Training offered by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The Saving Places Conference is open to all!
Monday – Thursday, February 4-7, 2019
The Sheraton Downtown Denver Hotel

For more information, visit the Saving Places website.